MAIN
Home
News
Intro
Maitreya
Background
Events
Media
Languages
Feedback
Archives
Updates
Site map
About us
Search
 Quick search
 

Print this page

Share International HomeShare International Home

 

 

 

 

Mysterious white knight visits crystal-tear girl
by Nabil Matraji 

Lebanese correspondent Matraji reports on the investigation into Hasah Mohammad Meselmani's miraculous experiences and the controversy surrounding the crystal tears which fell from her eyes.


Twelve-year-old Hasnah Mohamed Meselmani produced razor-sharp glass crystals from her eyes, Share International reported at the end of 1996. Nabil Matraji, our correspondent in the Lebanon, contacted the Meselmani family to find out more about the amazing phenomenon, which lasted from March till November 1996. A discussion with Hasnah confirmed that the unseen hand behind the crystal miracle was that of Maitreya. A report about the mysterious "white knight" follows.

Hasnah Mohamed Meselmani

Commotion stirred the Arab world: a girl was making hard glass crystals, sharp enough to cut paper, appear from her eyes seven times a day without any apparent injury to herself - it had to be some kind of miracle. The 12-year-old Hasnah Mohamed Meselmani became the centre of attention. Religious authorities and scientists sought answers to the riddle.

The answer soon came: it was 'fraud', and the girl had admitted it, at least that is how the story was reported. Many people were upset and disappointed, others, less inclined to believe in inexplicable 'miracles', were relieved. Lebanon and other Arab countries declared the file closed and silence descended on the story of Hasnah Mohamed Meselmani. And yet certain questions remained unanswered. For instance, questions about the nature of the so-called fraud. How did Hasnah manage to pull the whole thing off with crystals coming out of her eyes in full view of television cameras? If the television pictures were authentic and anything to go by, then fraud would seem to be out of the question: the girl's eye was filmed in close-up and showed pieces of glass slowly pushing out of her eyes as if coming from the retina. Could she have first hidden them in her eye herself? Or was it just illusion that the glass fragments were seen coming out through the retina? And had Hasnah mastered the trick of keeping them hidden in the corners of her eyes? And in both cases: how could she do it without sustaining any injuries with crystals shown to be sharp enough to cut paper, as also witnessed by the television cameras?

For Share International this was enough to encourage further investigation into the case, especially since Benjamin Creme's Master indicated that this was indeed yet another of Maitreya's many "signs".

In his first reply the Master added to the mystery with this puzzling piece of information: Yes, it was fraud but still a miracle, He said ambiguously. Asked for an explanation He added: it was fraud in that it only appeared that crystals were coming through Hasnah's retina whereas in fact they were tears which Maitreya transformed into crystals at the instant they left the tear duct. And that was the real miracle.

Armed with this information our colleague in Lebanon, Nabil Matraji, got in touch with Hasnah and her family. He was welcomed in a friendly and hospitable but also somewhat reserved manner by Hasnah's father. The publicity surrounding his daughter and the question of fraud had put him on his guard - at least that was Nabil's impression. Until, that is, Nabil told him that he belonged to a group of people who continued to believe that Hasnah had not perpetrated fraud and that, on the contrary, it was a real miracle and that she had been contacted by a "messenger from God".

"Hasnah's father changed at a stroke. Excitedly he said that that was exactly what Hasnah herself had said. He was just surprised that I too knew this, because the family had tried to keep it quiet," Nabil says.

When Hasnah came home from school a few hours later Nabil asked her to describe the person whom she had seen in her dream. "The girl became angry with her father, thinking he had betrayed her secret to me. Only when he had convinced his daughter that he had not said a word about her vision did she calm down and begin to tell me her story."

It all began in March 1996. She was at school when she felt something strange in her left eye - her first piece of crystal, which, understandably, troubled her. Back home, she told her family what had happened and, while she was doing so, a second piece of crystal appeared in her eye. Her father took her to the city of Chtaura to see Dr Araji, an ophthalmologist. She stayed in his clinic for two weeks, and the crystals kept flowing out of her eye. Dr Araji certified that the pieces were real crystals and said he had no scientific explanation of the phenomenon. It could only be understood, he thought, as an act of God.

A few days later, Hasnah was told the same thing in another strange event.

"One night," she told Nabil, "I was still awake when I heard someone tapping at the window. I got up, walked to the window and there I saw a man dressed in white. He was sitting on a white horse, he smiled at me and called me by name. He asked me if I would go outside to talk to him."

Hasnah went out through the front door. There stood the 'white knight', as she calls him, waiting for her. He was dressed from head to foot in a white tunic, which also covered his head and face. 'The white knight' said she needn't be afraid and he introduced himself to Hasnah as a 'messenger from God'. A conversation developed between them about which Hasnah revealed no further details, apart from the fact that the white knight led her to understand that it was he who had been behind the crystal tears, and that all went according to God's will. There was a witness to the conversation: Hasnah's little brother had followed her outside, heard his sister speaking, but failed to see who she was talking to.

'The white knight' visited her a few times again and gave her advice and various warnings. When Hasnah asked when the tears would stop the answer was: "When God wills."

A fascinating aside: during one of her meetings with the white knight he advised Hasnah that her whole family should leave their home temporarily because something unpleasant was about to happen. The family followed the advice - all except one son. The following day he was involved in a traffic accident, and although his car was a write-off, Hasnah's brother escaped without a scratch. The same evening she met the white knight yet again. He asked: "Didn't I say that ALL of you should leave the house?"

Nabil Matraji responded to these confidences by telling them his insights into the real circumstances. "I told them about Maitreya, as the World Teacher, the Christ and Mahdi which caused much excitement. Three hours later they were still asking me questions, about religion, about the era to come. What I said was an enormous relief to them since they had not really understood all that had happened to Hasnah. Their reaction: 'This must be made known everywhere, since this is the new hope for mankind.' "

At that stage of the conversation Nabil also learnt about the background to the allegations of fraud in the story.

At a certain point as events unfolded, Hasnah's father tried another ophthalmologist: Dr Salamoun in the American University Hospital in Beirut. While she was under observation, more crystals oozed out of her eye. The story became public: television stations, magazines and newspapers flocked to the house of the Meselmani family to meet the girl with the crystal tears.

Experts from Saudi Arabia took the material to their laboratories and certified they were real crystals. The next step was that Saudi Arabian authorities indicated that they preferred the story to be hushed up. "Hasnah's father told me that a lot pressure was put on him to keep quiet about it all," Nabil says. "They even offered him $50,000."

The offer was too tempting: the Meselmani family is anything but wealthy, and the father decided to accept the money. He did so in front of television cameras, and it was this picture that convinced the public that it had been a huge fraud after all: the whole incident was obviously all about money and the father had manipulated the crystals into his daughter's eye. Now he wouldn't think twice, he says: "If the crystals appear again then I will let the case be re-opened. God's will must be done."

Even after five hours of talking, reports Nabil, the family still did not want to let him go, so spellbound they were by his insight into the event. "Can't you stay the night? Then we will invite friends and we can continue our discussion till dawn."

With the promise to return soon for a second visit, Nabil finally took his leave only to be telephoned shortly after that by Hasnah's excited father: both his daughter and he had seen Maitreya in a dream. How did they know it was Maitreya? Nabil had shown the family the photographs of Maitreya's appearance in Nairobi, and it was in that form Maitreya appeared in their dreams. Maitreya, Mr Meselmani remembered, had spoken to him at length, but he could recall nothing of what had been said.

Hasnah, on the other hand, did remember some of the words the 'white knight' spoke to her in her dream. He kissed her on the forehead and said: "I will always be with you, even when you don't see me."


Editorial notes:

1. Maitreya's appearance as the 'white knight' on a white horse evokes interesting associations. In the Hindu tradition, Vishnu is awaited as the Kalki-avatar, also a white rider. In the Bible's Book of Revelation the rider on the white horse is also spoken of ("and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him [was] called Faithful and True"; 19:11). In the Persian tradition the same applies to Sosiosh, about whom Helena Petrovna Blavatsky wrote in her Theosophical Glossary: "Sosiosh - The Mazdean Saviour who, like Vishnu, Maitreya Buddha and others, is expected to appear on a white horse at the end of the cycle to save mankind."

2. That Maitreya appeared dressed in white with his face covered at first is not without significance within the Muslim tradition: it is forbidden to show the faces or make images of holy people or divine envoys.)

From the June 1997 issue of Share International


More on this topic

Archives main index

Background information page

 


HomeTop of Page

HOME | INTRODUCTION | MAITREYA | BACKGROUND| EVENTS | SEARCH | FOR NEWS MEDIA | LANGUAGES | FEEDBACK | ARCHIVES | SI NEWS | ABOUT US | UPDATES TO THE SITE |

First published April 1999, Last modified: 15-Oct-2005